AKEA Design - local blueprint experts

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GAINESVILLE, Fla., (WCJB) -- There's a lot more that goes into planning a new building than some may realize--about 1,500 pages of documents and blueprints.

But one Gainesville company is designing buildings using a method that is so advanced, customers can hold the building in their hands before its constructed.

From North Carolina to Texas, all the way down to the Caribbean, "if you want to design something, you want to renovate something, you have a building you want from scratch, or you have a building you want to renovate into something else," said Anthony Kwan, president of AKEA Design, "we design buildings" All right here out of Gainesville.

AKEA Design specializes in blueprints, but what makes them different is the software they use to do it.

"In the past it was a two-dimensional model, so think of it as a piece of paper, and you want to show a building on it," Kwan said, "Well you can't see vertical. You can't see how tall the walls are, you can't see how the pipes go up the wall, or through the ceiling, you can't see any of that. Revit takes that 2d into 3d."

With a program called Revit, AKEA Design engineers are able to create 3-D drawings and prints of buildings before they're made," said Kwan.

"It actually becomes a reality, where they can move it and touch it and actually move pieces of it if they want to,"

Not only does this program create miniature versions of a client's building...

"Now you can see that one pipe crosses and maybe another pipe is going to directly hit into it, now you can actually see that on the drawing, when it was flat you couldn't see it, but now its 3d, so now you can see where that conflict comes so you can maybe make it higher, or move it."

Revit saves engineers and constructors a lot of time by catching mistakes in advance. Using Revit helps the big picture project come together, but it's also instrumental in helping with the little details.

"if you want to know what kind of light bulb you have in a fixture, it can tell you...it becomes a living document."